All Work & No Play

During our last few days in the marina, we got on with a few tasks, such as changing the SSB radio cable on our backstay, something we had been meaning to do for almost a year.  The reception on our radio can be really poor and once Rob managed to saw through the connector the reason became apparent.  Bit of a mess, all corroded and stuck to the backstay.

Corroded Old SSB Connection

Corroded Old SSB Connection

The reason we had to wait for so long to replace it was down to not being able to find a plastic tube the right size for the red cable to fit inside but we got one in a hardware store here sat week, so no more excuses.

The SSB cable and backstay need to be kept apart, so there are spacers to facilitate that.

Rather Fetching Red Cable Within White Plastic Tube Giving a Pink Glow!

Rather Fetching Red Cable Within White Plastic Tube Giving a Pink Glow!

On top of that, we replaced the genoa sheets (ropes) as promised and that meant Rob had to be hauled up the forestay so he could tie them on.  He also decided it best to check how all the equipment was doing at the top of the mast and add some more chafe protector to the genoa halyard as it never moves.  Long way down from there but a good view of the deck.

View From The Top

View From The Top

Beyzano is now tied up in the lifting bay at Curacao Marine patiently waiting to be hauled out at the boatyard as we left Seru Boca this morning just after dawn.

On Her Way After 4 Months Tied To The Dock

On Her Way After 4 Months Tied To The Dock

It was a bit of a trial leaving the short berth as the wind was blowing us off the pontoon and there was very little option for the shore lines.  Between the bow thruster and a stern spring, we managed to get out without damaging us or another boat and then avoided the 4 shallow patches which awaited us on our way out of Spanish Water.  In addition there is a really nasty looking reef at the entrance, just itching to hole the hull.  All this before even a cup of coffee 🙁

Nasty Yacht Munchers

Nasty Yacht Munchers

It was reasonably calm outside and we hoisted the genoa and sailed with the wind almost behind us all the way to Willemstad, the capital town some 8 miles north of Spanish Water.  It was wonderful to be back on the water, sailing peacefully along and watching the flying fish playing all around us.

Where The 'Queen Emma' Floating Bridge Usually Is

Where The ‘Queen Emma’ Floating Bridge Usually Is

The entrance to the huge commercial harbour is easy to access between a red port buoy (European buoyage here) and a white marker.  Usually you need to radio up Fort Nassau on VHF 12 to request they open the floating bridge so you can get through but at the moment it is absent, away being repaired and we just motored in.

Under She Goes

Under She Goes

Then it was a matter of going under the road bridge, only the second time we’ve ever sailed under a bridge in Beyz but no danger of hitting this one as it is hundreds of feet high.  Then round to starboard and around the outside of 3 white buoys marking a very shallow patch and we were at the small marina and boatyard.  Our friends on ‘Blue’ helped us with our lines, we checked in and then moved to the lifting bay seeing zero on our depth!  There are excellent showers, a small Budget Marine Chandlery, daily courtesy buses to the supermarket, a thatched bar area and a long waiting dock for the trailer, which is where I am now, patiently waiting!

Waiting To Be Hauled Ashore

Waiting To Be Hauled Ashore

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2 Responses to All Work & No Play

  1. Malc (Destination Anywhere) says:

    Hi guys,
    I’m just wondering what you are using as your SSB antenna? Do you have a Kevlar wire through your plastic tubing, attached to some GTO15 back to your tuner? We had Staloc’s and used the backstay on our 473 but I’m just installing the SSB in our ’57 which doesn’t have stalocs in the backstays. I spoke to a supplier who suggested that I might get problems just running the Kevlar wire up the backstay but I presume your standoffs should get around that problem? Any thoughts, experience, guidance appreciated 🙂

    Cheers, Malc

  2. Rhian says:

    Hi Malc
    Not sure what we have running inside the plastic tubing but we bought it from Bob at either mailasail or sail mail (can’t remember which way round). It was the higher quality cable and is connected to the backstay above the insulator which looks like a staloc fitting. We were told that the spacers are vital to improve performance and reduce interference, although we have seen a few boats with it just taped to the backstay. I am sure you already know that the staloc fitting is used as an insulator, otherwise if you are holding the backstay when someone presses the transmit button, you would get a very big jolt.
    Hope that helps and good luck!

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